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  • ESG Everyday

Top 10 Physical Climate Risk Assessment Tool for TCFD Reporting

Updated: Mar 16, 2023



Pros: CHIRPS provides high-resolution precipitation data that can be used to assess flood risks and droughts. The data is freely available and can be easily downloaded from the CHIRPS website.


Cons: CHIRPS may not provide data on other climate hazards, such as heat waves or sea-level rise.



Pros: CoSMoS is a high-resolution coastal modeling system that can be used to assess the risk of flooding and erosion due to sea-level rise and storms. The system can also be used to identify areas that may be vulnerable to future climate change.


Cons: CoSMoS may be expensive to use, and it requires a high level of technical expertise to operate.



Pros: IAM is a comprehensive modeling framework that can be used to assess the impacts of climate change on different sectors, such as agriculture, energy, and transportation. The framework can also be used to evaluate different adaptation and mitigation strategies.


Cons: IAM requires a significant amount of data and technical expertise to operate, and the results may be sensitive to the assumptions made in the modeling process.


Pros: VRA is a flexible tool that can be used to assess the vulnerability of different communities and infrastructure to climate hazards. The tool can also be used to evaluate different adaptation strategies and identify gaps in existing risk management plans.


Cons: VRA requires a significant amount of data and may be time-consuming to use. The tool may also be sensitive to the quality of the data used in the assessment.



Pros: NCA is a comprehensive report that provides an overview of the current and future impacts of climate change on different sectors in the US, such as health, water, and infrastructure. The report is regularly updated and provides a wealth of information for policymakers and practitioners.


Cons: NCA may not provide site-specific information that is needed for local decision-making, and the report may be difficult for non-experts to understand.

It's worth noting that these tools are just a few examples of the many physical climate risk assessment tools available. The best tool for a specific assessment will depend on the specific needs and goals of the user.



Pros: GIS is a widely used tool that can be used to visualize and analyze climate data, such as temperature and precipitation. GIS can also be used to identify areas that are vulnerable to climate hazards, such as floods and landslides.


Cons: GIS requires a significant amount of technical expertise to operate and may be expensive to use.


7. Storm Surge and Wave Action Model (SSWAM)


Pros: SSWAM is a modeling tool that can be used to assess the risk of coastal flooding due to storm surges and wave action. The tool can also be used to evaluate the effectiveness of different adaptation strategies.


Cons: SSWAM requires a significant amount of data and technical expertise to operate, and the results may be sensitive to the assumptions made in the modeling process.


Pros: CAE is an online tool that provides information on different climate hazards and adaptation strategies for different regions in the US. The tool can be used to identify potential risks and adaptation strategies for different sectors, such as agriculture and water management.


Cons: CAE may not provide site-specific information, and the tool may be less useful for regions outside of the US.



Pros: RACER is a tool that can be used to assess the resilience of cities to climate hazards, such as floods and heat waves. The tool can be used to evaluate different adaptation strategies and identify areas where further action is needed.


Cons: RACER may be less useful for rural areas, and the tool may require a significant amount of data and technical expertise to operate.



Pros: The Sea Level Rise Viewer is an online tool that provides information on the potential impacts of sea-level rise on coastal communities in the US. The tool can be used to identify areas that are at risk of flooding and to evaluate different adaptation strategies.


Cons: The Sea Level Rise Viewer may not provide site-specific information, and the tool may be less useful for regions outside of the US.

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